Monday, July 14, 2008

IRAN TO BE FRAMED FOR LOCKERBIE? DID THE CIA BRING DOWN PAN AM 103?


According to the Scottish Sunday Express, 13 July 2008:

"The Lockerbie bomber is set to be sensationally freed on a 'technicality' because of a controversial legal stalemate involving top secret documents.

"Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi, 56, could even be released before the end of summer because of Westminster’s refusal to make public the papers relating to the 1988 disaster...

"The document is reportedly a German intelligence debriefing of an Iranian defector, who claimed Tehran paid a Palestinian terror cell to carry out the bombing, after the US accidentally shot down an Iranian passenger jet, in 1988." - Scottish Sunday Express: The World's Greatest Newspaper :: UK News ...

It is interesting that it is now Iran that is to be framed with probably fake evidence.

The real evidence that should be heard in court concerns alleged CIA drug smuggling on PanAm 103.

Reportedly, Major Charles McKee and his DIA team had collected evidence of CIA drug smuggling (from Lebanon into the USA with the help of Monzer al Kassar) and they were killed on PanAm 103 to silence them and destroy the evidence.

The alleged bomb maker Mr Kreeshat reportedly worked for the CIA. The Sunday Herald, Scotland on Sunday and the BBC have referred to alleged CIA drug smuggling on PanAm 103.

McKee may also have been killed because he knew too much about Operation Ringwind, which was set up to take care of all participants in October Surprise.


Photo of Kassar

Monzer al-Kassar, born in Syria in 1945, was known as the "Prince of Marbella."

Kassar is married to a sister of Ali Issa Dubah, a former chief of Syrian intelligence, and a close associate of Rifat Assad, the brother of Syria's former President Hafez Assad.

Kassar is said to have been a CIA asset, involved with Colonel Oliver North and General Richard Secord. ('Confession of an Iranian Terror Czar')

Reportedly, Rifat Assad, 'the Syrian boss of the Lebanese heroin industry', and Monzer al-Kassar took over Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in 1975 with the help of the Syrian Army.

Allegedly, heroin was transported from the Bekaa Valley to the USA on PanAm flights with the help of Kassar and elements of the CIA. (If Not Megrahi Then Who Is Really Responsible (from The Herald ))

Kassar has been linked to the Lockerbie Bombing.

On board Pan Am 103, on 21 December 1988, were Major Charles McKee, of the the US Defence Intelligence Agency in Beirut, and Matthew Gannon, CIA Deputy Station Chief in Beirut.

McKie and his team had reportedly discovered evidence that a 'rogue' CIA unit called COREA, was involved in the drugs business with Monzar Al-Kassar. (Part XIX(D): AN IRAN-CONTRA/AL QAEDA READER, cont'd)

Reportedly Al-Kassar 'was part of the secret network run by US Lt. Colonel Oliver North.'

Outraged that COREA was doing business with a Syrian 'who made money from drugs, arms and terrorism', the McKee team reportedly 'decided to fly to CIA HQ in Virginia to expose COREA'.

They flew on Pan Am flight 103 which came down over Lockerbie.

It has been alleged that Kassar has received regular CIA money deposited to his credit at the Katherein Bank, Vienna (A/c No. 50307495) and at the Swiss Bank Corporation in Geneva (A/c No. 510230C-86). ('Confession of an Iranian Terror Czar')

Kassar is said to be a very major arms and drugs smuggler.

In 1987, investigations into the Iran-Contra scandal found that al-Kassar had been paid 1.5 million pounds by someone in the U.S. government to sell arms to Nicaraguan Contras. (Monzer al-Kassar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

In 1992, al-Kassar made arms sales in the millions of dollars to Croatia, Bosnia and Somalia, violating United Nations arms embargoes to all three countries.

According to the US Drugs Enforcement Agency, Al-Kassar imports 20 % of the heroin that comes to the United States. (FTR-109 Monzer Al-Kassar & Co)

In 1992, the Spanish government arrested Kassar for his alleged involvement in the Achille Lauro hijacking. In 1995, and he was found not guilty on all charges.

In July 2006, the government of Iraq placed Kassar at number 26 on their "most wanted" list, calling him one of the main suppliers for the Iraqi insurgents.

On 8 June 2007, the DEA (US Drug Enforcement Administration) announced the arrest in Spain of Monzer al Kassar. This was said to be linked to arms sales to rebels in Colombia.

Kassar was arrested just days before the Libyan convicted of the Lockerbie bombing was granted a second extraordinary appeal and 'just days after Blair went to Tripoli to negotiate a deal that would save him the embarrassment of a fresh appeal.' ('Confession of an Iranian Terror Czar')

Aviation Terrorism and Security - Google Books Result


The source for the following is: http://www.constitution.org/ocbpt/ocbpt_08.htm from http://www.constitution.org/

"The covert operators that I ran with would blow up a 747 with 300 people to kill one person. They are total sociopaths with no conscience whatsoever." - Former Pentagon CID Investigator Gene Wheaton

On 21 December 1988, Pan Am flight 103 was blown up over Lockerbie in Scotland. 270 people died.

Minutes before flight 103 took off from London's Heathrow airport, FBI Assistant Director Oliver 'Buck' Revell took his son and daughter-in-law off the plane. [1001]

Revell was an associate of Lt. Colonel Oliver North who was linked to Iran-Contra. .[1002]

North ‘was a business associate of Syrian arms and drug runner Monzer al-Kassar.’ [1003]

Al-Kassar was closely linked with Rifat Assad, brother of Syrian ruler Hafez Assad. Rifat ‘was married to the sister of Ali Issa Dubah, chief of Syrian intelligence, who, along with the Syrian army, controlled most of the opium production in Lebanon's Bekka Valley.’ [1004]

Reportedly, al-Kassar was involved in shipping heroin from Lebanon into the USA.

Reportedly, al-Kassar's drug route to the United States was protected by the CIA.
[1006]

The American Drug Enforcement Agency "was already using Pan Am flights out of Frankfort, Germany, for ‘controlled delivery’ shipments of heroin." [1006]

A team led by Major Charles McKee of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), and Matthew Gannon, the CIA's Deputy Station Chief in Beirut, traveled to Lebanon to try to get some hostages released. [1012]

According to Juval Aviv, the Lockerbie investigator for Pan Am, McKee's team discovered the illegal CIA drug operation and refused to participate.

According to Aviv, McKee contacted the CIA headquarters but got no reply. McKee and Gannon, ‘against orders... decided to fly home to blow the whistle.’

According to Aviv: 'They had communicated back to Langley the facts and names, and reported their film of the hostage locations. CIA did nothing. No reply. The team was outraged, believing that its rescue and their lives would be endangered by the double dealing.

'By mid-December the team became frustrated and angry and made plans to return to the U.S. with their photos and evidence to inform the government, and to publicize their findings if the government covered up.'

Reportedly Ahmed Jibril (founder and leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command ) had a base near Frankfort. Reportedly, Jibril had links to al-Kassar.

Reportedly bomb maker Marwan Abdel Razzack Khreeshat was part of Jibril’s cell. On 26 October Khreesat was arrested and one of his bombs seized. Then Khreesat was mysteriously released. [1009]

Former CIA agent Oswald Le Winter stated, "…pressure had come from Bonn… from the U.S. Embassy in Bonn… to release Khreesat." [1010]

Reportedly, Khreesat worked for U.S. intelligence. [1011]

Allegedly, one of Khreesat's bombs was used to bring down Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie.

McKee, Gannon and five other members of their team were killed when Pan Am flight 103 came down over Lockerbie. ? [1013][1014]

~~

After the crash

A member of a mountain rescue team said: "We arrived within two hours [of the crash]. We found Americans already there." [1023]

According to George Stobbs, a Lockerbie police inspector, "[I] started to set up a control room, and [between] eleven o'clock and midnight, there was a member of the FBI in the office who came in, introduced herself to me, and sat down — and just sat there the rest of the night. That was it." [1024]

Tom Dalyell, a member of British Parliament, stated: "…Absolutely swarms of Americans [were] fiddling with the bodies, and shall we say tampering with those things the police were carefully checking themselves. They weren't pretending, saying they were from the FBI or CIA, they were just 'Americans' who seemed to arrive very quickly on the scene."

Dalyell recalled: "It was… odd and strange that so many people should be involved in moving bodies, looking at luggage, who were not members of the investigating force. What were they looking for so carefully? You know, this was not just searching carefully for loved ones. It was far more than that. It was careful examination of luggage and indeed bodies." [1027]

Dr. David Fieldhouse, the local police surgeon, identified Major McKee's body. "I knew that [the identification of] McKee was absolutely correct because of the clothing which correlated closely with the other reports and statements, and the computers that were linked up to Washington." [1028]

Jim Wilson, local farmer, told relatives of Pan Am victims that he was present "when the drugs were found." Wilson discovered a suitcase packed with heroin in one of his fields.

One Scottish police officer said that his department had been told to keep an eye out for the drugs early on.






When Pan Am flight 103 came down over Lockerbie, one of those killed was Major Charles McKee.

"According to Rodney Stich, Robert Hunt, former Navy SEAL commander and deep-cover CIA/ONI operative, described to him a CIA assassination squad called Operation Ringwind. This operation, according to Hunt, was under the control of then-Deputy Director of the CIA Robert Gates.

'''They call it Operation Ringwind, formed in early 1981. It was strictly to take care of all participants in October Surprise until they decide to shut the operation down. And that could be tomorrow morning, or ten years from now. Whoever they think is involved.'''

Bush administration’s Trojan Horse gift to America and the ...
Operation "Mount Rushmore" and "Operation Ringwind"

'Corrupt CIA officials, allowed the bombing of Pan Am 103 to proceed, because Charles McKee knew too much about "Operation Ringwind"' Mother Tells All About White House Sex Slave Ring And Son's Kidnapping

October surprise conspiracy theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


John Orr, joint head of CID in Strathclyde police, was the chief investigating officer in the Lockerbie case. Sir John Orr got promoted to Chief Constable of Strathclyde Police (1995 to 2001). (The Herald : News: OTHER NEWS)

'The Golfer' is the former Scottish police chief who has given lawyers a signed statement claiming that key evidence in the Lockerbie bombing trial was fabricated. 'The retired officer - of assistant chief constable rank or higher - has testified that the CIA planted the tiny fragment of circuit board crucial in convicting a Libyan for the 1989 mass murder of 270 people.' (Scotsman.com News - Police chief- Lockerbie evidence was faked)

Two state prosecutors from the US Department of Justice played an important role in the Lockerbie trial. The United Nations observer at the Lockerbie trial, Dr Hans Kochler, reported that two state prosecutors from the US Department of Justice were in court, and, although not listed in any of the official documents about the Court's officers, they were constantly briefing Scottish prosecutors. ( UN Claims Lockerbie Trial Was Rigged)

Lord Fraser was the lord advocate (1989-92) who initiated the case against Megrahi. On 20 December 2006 Lord Fraser was detained by police after they were called to Dundee Airport following reports of a disturbance on board an aircraft. Lord Fraser was charged with disorderly conduct. It was announced on 2 February 2007 that the Crown Office had dropped these charges due to insufficient evidence that an offence had been committed.

Lord Hardie, as Lord Advocate 1997-2000, was due to lead the prosecution team in the Lockerbie trial. Lord Hardie resigned just before the Lockerbie trial began. There were rumours that there was a lack of evidence to convict the Libyans.

Colin Boyd was Lord Hardie's successor as Lord Advocate. He became Lord Boyd of Duncansby.

Norman McFadyen, then regional procurator-fiscal for Edinburgh, headed the Crown Office trial team at Camp Zeist in the Netherlands. He got promoted to Crown Agent, head of department for the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.

Alan Turnbull, QC, was one of the two senior counsel leading the Crown team in the Lockerbie trial. In 2006, he became Scotland's youngest judge at the age of 47.

Advocate-depute Alastair Campbell, QC, was senior prosecution counsel in the Lockerbie trial. In 2003, he was appointed a judge and became Lord Bracadale.

Bill Taylor, QC, was defence counsel for Megrahi at Camp Zeist. He has been heavily criticised for failing to defend Megrahi successfully. He is now a sheriff.

Alistair Duff was the defence lawyer for Megrahi.

Professor Hans Koechler, the United Nations' observer at the Lockerbie trial and appeal, has accused Mr Taylor and Mr Duff of betraying Megrahi by failing to represent him properly.

Eddie MacKechnie was solicitor to Fhimah who was acquitted.

Tony Gauci was the key crown witness and owner of the Maltese shop where Megrahi was said to have bought the clothing reportedly placed around the bomb. At the trial, Tony Gauci was uncertain about the date he sold the clothes in question, and was not sure that it was Megrahi to whom they were sold. Gauci gave two earlier statements in which he identified convicted Egyptian terrorist Abu Talb as the person who bought clothing. Gauci gave earlier statements saying he did not sell a shirt to the man but six months later remembered selling shirts and the man. Two of Gauci's statements are missing. A babygro said to have been wrapped around the bomb and shown to the court blown to pieces was recovered intact, according to a statement from the woman who found it. Five years after the trial, Lord Fraser allegedly described Gauci as a “simple” man who might have been “easily led”. Lord Fraser was the lord advocate (1989-92) who initiated the case against Megrahi.

The Strathclyde police reportedly arranged for Gauci to go fishing, hillwalking and birdwatching in the Scottish Highlands. The Mail on Sunday newspaper said Gauci had been recorded on tape talking about five or six visits he had made to Scotland since 1988. Four members of Gauci's family are also said to have received some form of police hospitality during the investigation. (The Scotsman - Scotland - Lockerbie trial row over witness’s trip)

J Thomas Thurman was the FBI man who identified a fragment of a circuit board from a timing device which, he said, was from the Lockerbie bomb. Thurman was later removed from his FBI job after a US Department of Justice investigation concluded his FBI forensics lab had a record of fabricating evidence.

Edwin Bollier is head of the Swiss-based Mebo group which was supposed to have sold the timing device reportedly used in the Lockerbie bomb. Bollier claims that one of his employees supplied the Scottish police with a stolen timing device, which was then presented in the trial as having been found amidst the plane's wreckage.

Ulrich Lumpert is the Mebo employee who reportedly has now admitted that the device he handed over to Scottish investigators was one he himself had stolen from the company, rather than part of a batch delivered to Libya in the 1980s.

Lord Sutherland was the presiding judge at Camp Zeist.

The other two judges were Lord Coulsfield and Lord MacLean.

Lord Cullen was head of the five-judge panel which presided over the appeal of Megrahi at Camp Zeist in 2002. The other four judges were: Lord Kirkwood, Lord Osborne, Lord Macfadyen, and Lord Nimmo Smith.

~~

3 comments:

paul said...

Iran now?
Lockerbie is the atrocity that just keeps on giving.

David Howard said...

google: Quadri-Track ZCT

David Howard said...

The FBI uses polygraphs to eliminate suspects... http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/337485161

 
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