Sunday, July 13, 2008

Are the people of Glasgow East so conservative and so scared of change?



An ICM survey for the Sunday Telegraph, 12 July 2008, puts the Labour party on 47 per cent of the vote with its nearest challenger, the Scottish National Party (SNP), on 33 per cent. Labour set for crucial by-election victory

In our view, Labour may have to resort to massive vote fraud in order to hold on to Glasgow East.

Iain Macwhirter, in The Sunday Herald, 13 July 2008, sees things differently ( It’s been a long love affair ... but is the east end ready to end it?).

He explains why the Labour Party may hold on to Glasgow East.

Macwhirter writes that "the smart money is still on the monkeys (Labour) to win."

So, why might Labour win, according to Macwhirter?

1. "Many believe Labour is still the party of the working man and that voting Labour therefore must be the correct moral choice."

2. A third of the Glasgow East voters are Catholics. The Catholic Church has usually been in bed with Labour in this area.

3. "Labour... will be out and about in Glasgow parading their anti-capitalist credentials - at least until polling day."

4. "Glasgow East voters realise they could kill the UK Labour government by voting Labour out of its third-safest seat in Scotland... Better the monkeys you know than the monkeys you don't."



Iain Duncan Smith, in the Sunday Telegraph, 13 July 2008, describes Living, and dying, on welfare in Glasgow East.

"In Calton (in Glasgow East), male life expectancy, at 54, is lower than in North Korea, Iraq and South Yemen.

"The constituency contains the suburb of Shettleston, home of 'Shettleston man'.

"This individual has a low life expectancy. He lives in social housing, drug and alcohol abuse play an important part in his life and he is always out of work.

"His couch potato lifestyle is literally killing him. Alcoholism across Glasgow is a major killer: in one part of the East End, alcohol kills more people than heart attacks and lung cancer together."


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